planning the perfect marriage proposal

So you’ve been in a relationship for a while and you’re considering moving onto the next step with your partner- asking for their hand in marriage. Whether you’re looking to surprise them or you’ve spoken about it at length, planning the perfect proposal can pile on a whole lot of pressure. It’s something that you will (hopefully) only have to do once, and you want to get it right the first time. 

You may be wondering what elements go into planning the perfect proposal.  Does it all lie in the ring? Going to a fancy restaurant? Or getting an Air 2S drone to capture the moment from above?
For life’s planners, you will know that if you have everything laid out before you, then it’s more likely that things will go right for you. So instead of wondering how to propose and worrying whether all your plans will go accordingly, it is best to map out exactly how you want the proposal to go. How will you make it special? What can you do to make sure that you get the overjoyed ‘YES!!’ response that you’re after. 

The proposal is your time to shine. Here’s how you can absolutely nail it. 

 

Make It Personal 

As you’ve been getting to know your partner throughout your time dating, you will understand if they like a bug fuss made of them or whether they prefer things to be more intimate. It’s no good arranging a proposal in front of crowds in a big public square with fanfares, fireworks and gospel choirs if they like to blend in. Yes, a proposal is the time that you want to make your partner feel loved and appreciated, but for shyer types, it is best to stick to a more intimate setting. 

Romance means different things to different couples, but the proposal is the time where you want to pull out all the stops. So what does romance mean to the both of you? Is it grand gestures or is it the little things? 

Perhaps there’s a special place that you have been to together that already holds memories for you and your partner together. Maybe your partner has shared a spot that has close meaning to them, or vice versa. Start with special because the proposal is the story you’re going to be telling friends and family members for many years to come. 

 

Show Them What They Mean To You 

A marriage proposal is the perfect opportunity for you to share what makes that person to special to you and exactly why you love them so much. Be specific. Talk about special moments, the things they do that make you smile, how they make you feel loved as well. Bring up things you have said about your future goals as a couple.  

You might think that producing a ring (if you choose to use one as your expression) or asking the other person to marry you is enough to make the proposal great. A beautiful ring handed over without real context as to what the rest of their lives spent with you would mean might not get you the answer you’re looking for. 

Make sure to keep the humor to a minimum. This is a very heartfelt event, and even if one of the things that your partner loves about you is your sense of humor, there is a time and a place to crack jokes--the proposal isn’t it. It’s the opportunity for you to express your sincerity as you talk about moving your lives forward together. 

 

Keep Distractions To A Minimum 

If you’re somebody who is constantly plugged in for work and is prone to receiving work notifications every few seconds (who isn’t these days?) then do everything you can to avoid interruptions during this event in your life.

In a moment that is supposed to be about you and this special person spending the rest of your lives together, neither of you want to remember it with the sound of alerts coming through. Switch off your alerts- they can wait. Even better, try to find a place with limited wifi so they don’t come through at all. You want to do everything possible to make sure that you can both focus in on the main event and remember it for the romantic occasion you wanted it to be. 

Make It Part Of An Event- But Never Somebody Else’s! 

Unless it becomes one of those ‘I absolutely need to ask you now’ situations, you should try to make the proposal a part of a planned event.

That doesn’t mean to say to pop to question during your sister’s wedding or at a birthday party--basically any event that isn’t planned by you is a real no-go for wedding proposals. It can cause some tension between you and the person who’s event you have effectively crashed.

At the same time, to help make the proposal memorable, try to make it as part of another event. The getting down on one knee and asking the big question only lasts around 5-10 seconds, so you want to build an event around that. Some couples will get engaged on weekend trips, while others like to build scavenger hunts around their city, or propose at a concert (that’s one of the few exceptions to the event crashing rule!)

Consider planning an engagement party so you get to celebrate with all of your friends and family present. 

 

Make it a surprise 

Even if you’ve discussed your future at length, you don’t want your partner to know exactly when you’ll be proposing to them. Don’t hint at engagement for several weeks before you ask them, and make sure you don’t alter your behavior which can heighten suspicion. 

That way, if you plan an event like a scavenger hunt, they’re more likely to play it like a game rather than as something leading towards the proposal. The most beautiful proposals are the ones that are unexpected and can be met with genuine shock and joy!

Thank you

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